Site Loader
Rock Street, San Francisco

TRAVEL LEARN PLAY REPORT LIVE RESEARCH 2009 WORK GROW traveller profile travel treNDS aBoUt coNtiKi appeNDiX ACHIEVE overview Did you get the latest memo? Gone are the days of choosing between collecting career kudos or tallying up travel tales – today’s young Aussies want (and are getting) it all, as they balance their passports with PDAs while flying up the corporate ladder. As the world’s leading travel company for 18 to 35s, Contiki is all about remaining plugged in and switched on to what young people want.

In our first annual Contiki Travel Trends Research Report, the iTraveller Report, we exposed the rise of the intellectual traveller, focused on authentic cultural experiences. Last year we examined the relationship between young people’s travels and sustainable tourism in the Shades of Green Report. So, with career such an important focal point for most 18 to 35 year olds, this time around we got suited, booted and clocked on, commissioning in-depth research to see how globetrotting affects the work lives of young Aussies and vice versa.

Fasten your seatbelts ladies and gentlemen; our young population sees many benefits from travelling. Our 2009 research report The Skilled Set reveals 97% of young Aussies believe travel gives people skills which can help with their career or life in general. They’re chucking out Chicken Soup for the Soul and checking into the world’s most fascinating places in the name of first-hand experience…and achieving personal and career growth at the same time. More than three quarters of young Australians agree travellers acquire skills they would never learn in the workplace.

From budget and people management skills to a better understanding of world issues, and much more, they’re developing a vast portfolio of skills that is taking them straight from sightseeing to CV-ready. From the boarding gate to the boardroom, we’ve also tapped into what tips the scales to achieve the perfect work-life balance. The results have been weighed and one thing’s for sure – young Australians are taking advantage of their annual leave by swapping computer screens for exotic sights.

The results are crystal clear; Australia’s 18 to 35s are jetsetting before job-hunting with travel coming out top dog of desires on their ‘to-dos’. And with the one-size fits all travel tenit of yesteryear firmly in the outbox, young travellers are favouring flexibility, freedom and the perfect fit for their holidays. With Contiki, 18 to 35s can tailor-make their holidays to achieve an ideal mix of fun, cultural insights and life-enriching experiences, meaning everyone, whether full-time, part-time or no-time worker, can dip into the bag of awesome adventures the world has to offer.

Step into my office and discover more… Introduction OVERVIEW CAREER & TRAVEL TRAVELLER PROFILE TRAVEL TRENDS ABOUT CONTIKI APPENDIX TAMMY MARSHALL OVERVIEW CAREER & TRAVEL TRAVELLER PROFILE TRAVEL TRENDS ABOUT CONTIKI APPENDIX overview “ contents SECTION 1 OVERVIEW 7 executive summary 9 research methodology 10 research snapshot SECTION 3 TRAVELLER PROFILE 29 31 33 35 37 39 the sense of savings frequent flyers planes, trains, automobiles travel tracks what they want making a break for it SECTION 5 ABOUT CONTIKI 54 about contiki 56 contiki timeline career & travel SECTION 2 CAREER & TRAVEL 5 17 19 21 23 25 the en-rich list balancing work & life venus & mars generation gap money matters stats, stamps & salaries SECTION 6 APPENDIX 59 the survey traveller profile SECTION 4 TRAVEL TRENDS 43 45 47 49 51 global footprints the euro files asia fantasia across the ditch yankee doodle doo travel treNDS aBoUt coNtiKi appeNDiX Executive Summary career & travel For today’s Aussies aged 18 to 35 (singles and duos, sans children), the lure of distant shores (and those not so far off) is as strong as an Italian espresso, with domestic and overseas travel ranked as their two main aspirations.

Furthermore, 1. 1 million (66%) of these budding jetsetters are pinching their pennies to realise their travel dreams. Furthermore, 76% of young people believe travel teaches people skills they would never learn in the workplace, 55% think it helps make you a better employee and 51% agree people who have travelled have a better attitude to work. The majority are singing the praises of a good work-life balance and are not backwards in coming forwards identifying what this entails.

Unsurprisingly good working conditions (78%), working hours (76%) So, knowing how important travel is to this generation, Contiki wanted and spending time with family and friends (73%) feature highly. to suss out how they feel about hitting the daily grind compared to But proving the travel bug bites hard, the ability to take short breaks hitting the road, and what role (if any) they see globetrotting plays in and look forward to holidays ranked as important to 71% and bolstering their climb up the corporate ladder. 66% respectively.

The key revelation that emerged from our research, The Skilled Set, is that, although travel has previously been seen as purely for play, there is growing recognition of the positive part it plays in personal skill development, both in and out of the workplace. A whopping 97% of 18 to 35s believe travelling gives people skills that can help with both their professional and personal pursuits. Topping this skills list was gaining a better understanding of different customs and cultures (76%) and a better awareness of world issues (71%). Also identified were skills with specific relevance to the workplace. 3% believe travel helps develop skills to deal with different personalities (think: negotiating a cross-city fare with a seasoned tuk-tuk driver in Bangkok), 58% believe it assists with budgeting skills (hmmm…. Moulin Rouge or moules mariniere? ) and 51% cite problem solving and decision making ability as skills picked up on the road. Also on the agenda, is the latest snapshot of where young Aussies have been on their most recent trips, and where they’re headed next, with a breakdown of the top ranked regions, including Asia, Europe, USA and New Zealand, as well as how they want to travel and what’s important while away.

The way that they are getting away has also evolved, with more and more young Aussies proving they are crazy for couture, opting for completely tailor-made travel options (13%) or a combination of tailor made and independent (46%) over independent travel (37%), where they are responsible for organising everything. Contiki continues to lead the charge in the youth travel sector. This report, the third in the Contiki Travel Trends Research series, offers the latest insight into the youth travel market, providing a 360°, bird’s eye view of the 18 to 35 demographic. traveller profile travel treNDS aBoUt coNtiKi appeNDiX

OVERVIEW 7 Research Methodology This research was commissioned by Contiki Holidays and conducted by Galaxy Research. The study comprised of 509 respondents aged 18-35 years who have aspirations for travel in the next three to four years. Participants were either single or double income adults with no kids. The survey was conducted online through a permission based panel. The sample was stratified by age, sex and area and, following the completion of field work, was weighted by age, sex and area to reflect the latest ABS (Australian Bureau of Statistics) population estimates. areer & travel traveller profile travel treNDS aBoUt coNtiKi appeNDiX OVERVIEW 9 Research Snapshot Overseas and domestic travel are the two main aspirations for Australians aged 18 to 35. Young Australians are snapping up haute couture holidays over put together pieces with 13% preferring completely tailor-made holidays, 46% a combination of tailor-made and independent trips and 37% taking on independent trips where they are responsible for organising all aspects. Travel is breaking the bank, the piggy bank that is, as 1. 7 million Australians intend to travel overseas in the next three to four years, with 1. million, or two in three (66%) aspiring travellers currently depositing into their porcelain pigs to save for it. It seems many young Australians are carving out their own backyard blitzes, with 1. 5 million intending to travel domestically and 570,000 (37%) currently saving for it. It is no surprise that seeing the sights (98%) and new places (97%) are the two most important ticks in an overseas checklist, but being able to relax and gain perspective (96%), broadening horizons (96%), having a break from work or study (95%) and achieving a good work-life balance (90%) also rated highly on the Richter scale of travel.

Proving the best travel souvenirs are skills, nearly all (97%) 18 to 35s believe travelling gives people skills that can help with their career or life in general. Some of the greatest gains from globetrotting identified by young people include: teaches people skills they would never learn in the workplace (76% agree); helps make them a better employee (55% agree) and gives them a better attitude to work (51% agree). career & travel

Many young Australians believe travel has a positive impact on their lives professionally as 47% agree travel helps their career prospects and 35% agree an employer is more likely to hire someone who has travelled than someone who has not. The research shows work-life balance is an essential ingredient to being happy in the workplace. The top five elements identified in achieving a good work-life balance include: good working conditions (78%) and working hours (76%), spending time with family and friends (73%), the ability to take short breaks (71%) and being able to look forward to holidays (66%).

Asia is the most popular region young people have visited in the last three to four years (50%), followed by the Pacific (32%), Europe (29%) and the Americas (24%). In the next five years, young Aussie travellers have their sights firmly set on making European dreaming a reality with England (70%), France (65%) and Italy (61%) the big three to see. An Asian adventure is on the cards for many young Australians, with Bangkok (45%), Ho Chi Minh City (32%) and Hanoi (23%) the top three to be dealt from the deck.

The USA is still A-OK for Aussies with savings going towards spend-happy holidays in New York (75%), LA (61%) and Las Vegas (57%). Love thy neighbour is the resounding resolve of young Australians with a large number jumping the fence to visit New Zealand in the next five years with Auckland (72%), Christchurch (57%) and Wellington (56%) the top spots to see across the Tasman. traveller profile travel treNDS aBoUt coNtiKi appeNDiX OVERVIEW 11 c a re e r CAREER & TRAVEL Forget the old sombrero from Mexico and stein from Germany, today’s travellers are returning home with much more than a few tacky souvenirs.

Travel is increasingly seen by young Australians as a way to acquire and cultivate skills important to their lives and careers. But to what degree do young people feel travel impacts their careers? And what skills do they feel they are bringing home with them like souvenirs from their OS trips? And, once back at their desks, what do they feel constitutes the ideal work-life balance and how does their desire to travel fit into the puzzle? The relationship between work and travel is a complex one which is influenced by factors such as age, gender, work status, money and more. Take a look at the modern young Australian.

Farewell the rebel-without-a-cause types and enter the era of the knowledge nomads, filling their backpacks with experiences vital to enhancing their lives and resulting in well-rounded skill sets. & travel TRAVELLER PROFILE TRAVEL TRENDS ABOUT CONTIKI APPENDIX “ career convictions – from sightseeing to CV Forget the old sombrero from Mexico and stein from Germany, today’s travellers are returning home with much more than a few tacky souvenirs. Travel is increasingly seen by young Australians as a way to acquire and cultivate skills important to their lives and careers. But to what degree do young people feel travel impacts their careers?

And what skills do they feel they are bringing home with them like souvenirs from their OS trips? And, once back at their desks, what do they feel constitutes the ideal work-life balance and how does their desire to travel fit into the puzzle? The relationship between work and travel is a complex one which is influenced by factors such as age, gender, work status, money and more. Take a look at the modern young Australian. Farewell the rebel-without-a-cause types and enter the era of the knowledge nomads, filling their backpacks with experiences vital to enhancing their lives and resulting in well-rounded skill sets. raveller profile travel treNDS aBoUt coNtiKi appeNDiX The en-rich list Travel translating into the workplace? You betcha! Nearly all (97%) young Aussies believe travelling gives people skills that can help with their career or life in general. Furthermore, 76% agree travelling teaches people skills they would never learn in the workplace. Perhaps it’s time for recruiters to conduct passport checks, as well as reference checks. Over half of 18 to 35s agree that travel helps make them a better employee (55%) and that people who have whisked their way around the world have a better attitude to work (51% agree). oming home with more than souvenirs Long has the lure of exotic lands and unknown cultures captured the imagination of young people. But jet setting across the globe has traditionally been seen as no work and pure play, possessing little connection to career and skill development. Until now. traveller profile 63% believe OS travel develops skills to deal with different personalities, 58% believe travel enhances their ability to budget and 51% cite problem solving and decision making ability as skills learnt while away. A solid skills set as a souvenir definitely beats that ‘Mind the Gap’ (97%) young merchandise.

And it’s certainly no accident young Aussies are retuning home with valuable excess baggage. To the overwhelming majority, the opportunity to broaden their horizons (96%) and be able to better understand people and cultures that are different to their own (95%) are important factors when considering a trip abroad. Nearly all Aussies believe travelling gives people skills that can help with their career or life in general. travel treNDS The message is loud and clear. Taking off to travel can take you notches up the career ladder.

According to this generation, travellers develop a diverse skill set beneficial to career and life in general while on the road. Topping this list of skills acquired while away: a better understanding of different cultures and customs (76%), better awareness of world issues (71%) and better social skills (69%). Young Australians also identified greater confidence (65%), tolerance (58%) and maturity (57%) as other skills they can transfer from their backpacks to briefcases. It seems travellers are getting much more than they bargained for in the exotic bazaars of Cairo and colourful markets of Thailand. BoUt coNtiKi 76% Understanding Cultures & Customs 69% Better Social Skills 65% Greater Confidence 58% Ability to budget 57% Maturity 51% Problem solving & decision making appeNDiX CAREER AND TRAVEL 15 Balancing work & life what’s tipping the scale? It’s hardly surprising to hear that today’s young people, known for their penchant for wanting and getting it all, crave work-life balance. traveller profile It seems those in the workforce are most likely to get in on the balancing act as nearly all full-time (92%) and part-time workers (89%) believe work-life balance is an important consideration. riends took third place, with 73% recognising the importance of their nearest and dearest in their work-life balance. While much has been written about the goldfish-style attention spans and lack of loyalty from Gen Y in the workplace, only 17% felt Additionally, it’s a case of mo’ money, mo’ problems for the high that being able to change jobs regularly was earners, 93% of those with an annual important in attaining the ultimate work-life income of $70,000 or more believe a workWith travel identified balance. ife balance is important, compared to 87% as the number one aspiration of those earning under $40,000. It seems if today’s 18 to 35s can check other for young people, time to sip, boxes, including the all-important ability to But what ingredients are important to take well-deserved “escapations” away from young people in the mixology of today’s work- swirl and sample different it all, then all the so-called job hopping could life cocktail? cultures maketh a happy be stopping. With travel identified as the number one camper at work. spiration for young people, time to sip, swirl and sample different cultures maketh a happy camper at work. 71% believe being able to take short breaks and get away from it all is important, while anticipation is the answer for 66% who ticked being able to look forward to holidays Good working Reasonable conditions working hours as important. travel treNDS aBoUt coNtiKi 78% 76% Hitting the 9 to 5 grind is fine with 76%, who ranked reasonable working hours as number two, pipped at the post by good working conditions, identified as important to 78%.

And there’s no need for mums, nannas, brothers and BFFs to complain about a lack of face time. Spending time with family and 71% Short breaks 66% Looking forward to holidays appeNDiX CAREER AND TRAVEL 17 What do the girls weigh up in the worklife balancing equation? Being able to look forward to holidays (73%), ability to take short breaks (77%); reasonable working hours (82%) and spending time with family and friends (80%) Venus a comparison Smiles for travel miles. 69% of women believe that jet setting results in greater confidence 2% of the girls agree with the statement “travel makes me a better employee”. Travel teaching people skills they never learn in the workplace gets the thumbs up from the ladies, with 77% agreeing 32% are regaling travel tales on their resumes, agreeing with the statement “an employer is more likely to hire someone who has travelled than someone who has not” 49% would rather postpone the 9 to 5 to see the world while they are young 43% of girls agree that stamps in the passport get the stamp of approval from employers Mars of the sexes 9% of lads believe travel takes you up, not down the career ladder, agreeing with the statement, “overall, travel helps my career prospects” What makes life on Mars achieve a good work-life balance? Being able to look forward to holidays (61%), ability to take short breaks (66%); reasonable working hours (71%) and spending time with family and friends (68%) The Adam’s apples are shouting “yes” the loudest when it comes to the statement “travel makes me a better employee”. Over half of all males (57%) answered in the affirmative traveller profile 1% of males believe you stand taller from travelling, agreeing it results in better confidence 75% are ready to sign up for the school of travel, believing that taking off to travel teaches you skills you could never learn in the workplace travel treNDS 55% of boys would rather put off professional life to travel while they are young Men are making note of their latest travel tales with 37% agreeing with the statement “an employer is more likely to hire someone who has travelled than someone who has not” aBoUt coNtiKi appeNDiX CAREER AND TRAVEL

19 Generation gap he state of each age mind How do travel and career attitudes compare between those at the young end of the scale, those in their mid-to-late twenties and those who’ve hit and passed the big three-oh? change their passion for fashion really exist? It seems not, as this The older they get, the more young Aussies agree with the notion factor was unanimously relegated to the bottom of all their lists. that travel helps careers. 30 to 35 year olds more readily agree When it comes to careers, it seems 18 to (63%) that travel makes them a better 35s prefer to fly long haul. mployee than those aged 18 to 24 (55%) and Does this generation’s 25 to 29 (50%). However, 18 to 24s and 30 Younger Australians (61% of 18 to 24s) are to 35s agree that overall, travel helps their reputation for changing jobs far more likely to agree that they prefer to career prospects (50% and 48% respectively), as often as they change their see the world while they are young and pave compared to 39% of 25 to 29s. their professional path afterwards than 25 to passion for fashion really 29s (45%) and 30 to 35s (42%). A sentiment that abounds all ages however, is exist? hat travellers pick up skills they would never While it is clear that the priorities and learn in the workplace, with around three attitudes to career vary across the 18 to 35 quarters agreeing. demographic, over 90% of each age bracket agree that a break from work or study to travel is important, as well as a resounding Younger Australians (72% of 18 to 24s and 74% of 25 to 29s) collective agreement that travel has a positive impact upon career believe travel gives them a better awareness of world issues, and life in general. compared to 64% of 30 to 35s. 9% of 18 to 24s believe travel leads to greater maturity compared with 51% of those with a bit more mileage (30 to 35s). traveller profile travel treNDS aBoUt coNtiKi 50% 39% 48% And a similar story has been revealed when it comes to what constitutes a good work-life balance. All agree on the importance of this goal, but the number one element for both 18 to 24s and 30 to 35s is good working conditions, where as 25 to 29s place reasonable working hours at the top of their lists. But when it comes to young Australians’ job jumping habits, does this generation’s reputation for changing jobs as often as they

Travel helps career (18-24s) Travel helps career (25-29s) Travel helps career (30-35s) 61% See the world while they are young (18-24s) 45% See the world while they are young (25- 29s) 42% See the world while they are young (30-35s) appeNDiX CAREER AND TRAVEL 21 Money matters from savings to salaries With globetrotting a significant investment for many young travellers, their salaries do affect their savings in getting them from deskbound to departure lounge. But how do young people’s dollars affect their sense on the topic of travel and career? raveller profile 61% of those with an annual income over $70K and 59% of those earning $40K to $70K are more likely agree travel helps make them a better employee than those raking in less than $40K (47%). Same goes for over 50% of workers (both full and part-time), compared to 41% of non-workers. From high-flying high-earners to studentsalary scrimpers, around three quarters of people agree that travel teaches skills you’d never learn in the workplace. bracket are all about the networking know-how, most believe meeting new people is important to a good work-life balance.

Those with less cash are more likely to agree that managing the money belt while travelling contributes to budget balancing skills (60% of those earning under $70K), versus 48% of those earning over $70K. 78% of those earning up to $40K believe people gain a better awareness of world issues from travelling, compared to 68% of those earning $40K to $70K and 65% of top earners. Those are more likely to agree that managing the money belt while travelling contributes to budget balancing skills. But money talks. Or flies in this case. On the whole, 18 to 35s have visited an average of four countries in the last three to four years.

However, those with an annual paycheck of over $70K have been to six. It’s clear travel remains a non-negotiable contract clause for both penny pinchers to with less cash those who are rocking the cashbar in a big way. travel treNDS aBoUt coNtiKi Regardless of income, almost all 18 to 35s believe achieving a worklife balance is important. It’s higher education for higher earners, with 52% wanting time to hit the books to expand their education to achieve this balance. On the flip side, those in the lowest income appeNDiX CAREER AND TRAVEL 23 Stats, stamps & salaries what does it all mean?

Make no mistake, this generation of ambitious young Australians is not about to sacrifice play for work. The relentless navigation of their career paths and flight paths are making for busy skies across our great island nation as our 18 to 35s strive to juggle demands and desires while achieving the perfect work-life balance. traveller profile The key revelation (or perhaps travelation) is that almost all 18 to 35 aged Aussies agree that travel fosters the development of skills that can help in career or life in general. people believe travelling tallies up skills they could never learn from the workplace.

Instead of defining themselves purely by their professions or local stomping ground as many of their parents may have done, today’s But they’re not launching themselves blindly overseas and stumbling young Australians are increasingly developing their personal and across these benefits by accident. They’re starting with a shopping professional identities through a set of list of strategically thought-out desires Sky-high on the latest carefully planned, culturally diverse and when considering a trip overseas and are challenging life experiences. ctively seeking out culturally challenging and travel agenda are stimulating trips to meet these needs. elements such as achieving As the number one aspiration for today’s young people, the travel drum is beating Unsurprisingly, seeing new places (important a good work-life balance, louder than ever, and fitting travel into their to 97%) and meeting new people (80%) are broadening horizons and increasingly complex lives is a necessary and on the list. But sky-high on the latest travel being able to relax and non-negotiable clause in any young person’s agenda are elements such as achieving a employment contract. ood work-life balance (important to 90% of gain perspective. young people), broadening horizons (96%) and being able to relax and gain perspective (96%). With nearly 50% of young Australians agreeing travel helps their career prospects, and a fraction more agreeing travel helps make better employees, it appears that travellers’ horizons are becoming as broad the Nullabor. While away they are gaining greater maturity, patience, tolerance, problem solving and budgeting skills, the ability to deal with different personalities, and much more. So it fits the bill that 76% of travel treNDS aBoUt coNtiKi 97% 96% 96%

Seeing new places Broadening horizons Relax and gain perspective 90% Good work-life balance 80% Meeting new people 76% Acquire skills appeNDiX CAREER AND TRAVEL 25 traveller TRAVELLER PROFILE Calling a recess on the work vs travel debate, we’ve put young travellers under the microscope to get a closer look at what makes them tick. What are they saving their hard-earned cash for and when it comes to their travel habits, how often do they like to make a break for it, what type of trips do they like to take, what’s important to them while on the road and when do they think is the very best time in life to travel? rofile TRAVEL TRENDS ABOUT CONTIKI APPENDIX “ IDs please – profiling today’s young travellers Calling a recess on the work vs travel debate, we’ve put young travellers under the microscope to get a closer look at what makes them tick. What are they saving their hard-earned cash for and when it comes to their travel habits, how often do they like to make a break for it, what type of trips do they like to take, what’s important to them while on the road and when do they think is the very best time in life to travel? travel treNDS aBoUt coNtiKi appeNDiX

The sense of savings where is it all going? With a smorgasbord of delights on offer for young Aussies – travel, cars, career, their very own pad, just to name a few – life really is like a box of chocolates. But which of life’s spoils are snapped up first and which are shuffled down the priority list? up 8% on last year. Evidence that there’s not a total brick or mortis Dreams before dollars? At the top of this generation’s wish list is in the current property market, saving for their own piece of real travel, both home and away.

For solo and coupled-up Australians aged 18 to 35 with no offspring, overseas (88%) and domestic (80%) estate comes in at number two at 44%, also up 5% on last year, followed by domestic travel and cars (both travel are the top two aspirations, followed by 31%) and a big ticket item (28%). purchasing their own property (66%), buying The passion for travel a big ticket item (63%) such as a plasma and Just 8% of young Australians are not saving getting their own set of wheels (61%). among this demographic at all.

And interestingly, the spendorphins is as clear as daylight, increase with age. 7% of 18 to 24s, 9% of 25 The passion for travel among this to 29s and 10% of 30 to 34s enjoy parting demographic is as clear as daylight, demonstrating that life with their hard-earned cash rather than demonstrating that life experiences trump experiences trump material saving it. material possessions. And this generation of savvy savers are wasting no time filling their piggy banks to realise their dreams. Of the 1. million young Australians who intend to travel overseas in the next three to four years, 1. 1 million are putting their money where their mouths are and saving for their trips. Of those 1. 5 million intent on holidaying on our own sunny shores, 37% are devotedly depositing their dosh to discover their very own domestic bliss. How does travel compare with what else they are saving for? Well passports please, international travel tops the list, again at 58%, travel treNDS possessions. aBoUt coNtiKi 88% International travel 0% Domestic travel 66% Property 63% Big ticket item 61% Car 8% appeNDiX Not saving TRAVELLER PROFILE 29 Frequent flyers the long ; the short of it Just like travellers themselves, the types of trips that young Aussies plan to take in the next three to four years come in many different shapes, sizes and styles. So, what’s the latest trend on today’s airport runways? The trip of a lifetime favoured by our folks is still sticking around (22%) but more and more young Australians today are favouring frequency. 3% of young people want to pad out their overseas sojourns over a number of trips while 28% plan to live the travel life for as long as possible, travelling extensively for a number of months. With factors such as broadening their horizons and being able to relax and gain perspective vitally important to 96% of today’s young people when considering an overseas trip, it’s hardly surprising that this generation want to travel overseas frequently, rather than following their parents’ lead, taking a once-only trip of a lifetime. frivolous leisure pursuit.

It will be recognised as an essential characteristic of today’s world-wise generation of 18 to 35s. From full-time workers for whom saving their salaries is as important as saving their annual leave, to those not working, pinching their pennies and planning an extended adventure, travel is not only on the cards, it’s the ace of spades in the deck of life for young Australians. Salaries generation want may be negotiable, but travel certainly is not. This to travel overseas frequently, rather than following their parents’ lead, taking a onceonly trip of a lifetime. travel treNDS aBoUt coNtiKi

With the information age thriving and popular culture a jigsaw of multinational pieces, young people want to live, touch and breathe the multiculturalism our world has to offer. And with increased access to travel tools via the net, getting from the World Wide Web to the Whole Wide World has never been easier. What’s more, as the benefits of what globetrotting instills into travellers’ lives and careers are more readily recognised, packing your bags for distant shores will no longer be seen as a mere 43% A number of overseas trips 28% Travel extensively for a number of months 22% Trip of a lifetime appeNDiX TRAVELLER PROFILE 31

Planes, trains, automobiles the different types of travel So when leaving our shores for unknown lands do our young countrymen and women like to go it alone, get a little help or have someone else arrange their entire trips for them? Like ever-evolving fashion followings, new travel trends are also emerging. Today’s young Australians are opting for nipped, tucked and tailored to suit holidays (59%), incorporating a mix of sightseeing, culture and adventure when travelling somewhere they’ve never been before. Among those seeking an element of tailormade, 13% want everything arranged for them and served on a silver platter.

The other 46% are opting for a combo of tailormade and independent travel. A tasting plate of travel styles, if you will. For this 59%, or over 1. 1 million young Australians, the contemporary Contiki menu has all tastes covered. With flexibility king, travellers enjoy loads of free time to independently explore the sights on every Contiki trip. They get the insider knowledge from a team of experienced tour managers who are always in the know on the latest buzz in each city, ensuring travellers’ independent time is spent exactly how they want.

For the 13% of today’s young aspiring travellers who are seeking a completely tailor-made trip, Contiki’s action and culture-packed carte du jour of optional activities will ensure their days are completely covered with a broad range of fun, insightful and enriching experiences. On the other side of the table, 37% of 18 to 35s are opting to go it alone and serve themselves what they will from the smorgasbord of experiences on offer. Today’s young Australians are opting for nipped, tucked and tailored to suit holidays (59%), incorporating a mix of sightseeing, culture and adventure when travelling somewhere they’ve never been before. ravel treNDS aBoUt coNtiKi 46% Combo of tailor-made ; independent 13% Everything tailor-made 37% Independent travel appeNDiX TRAVELLER PROFILE 33 Travel tracks following their footprints So what travel beat are young travellers tapping their feet to? Are they hop, step and jumping from continent to continent, country to country, or lingering longer in one place to really get into the groove? adventurers aren’t new to the transit lounge, but are jet setting The answer is, they are packing as much as possible into their junkies hungry for more, a sign of our increasingly culture-craving, trips.

The most common overseas adventure planned by 18 to well-travelled young population. Contiki’s in-depth regional trips 35s is one where they travel to more than one country on a single ensure this nearly 600,000 strong group continent. This 47% want to flamenco in are on the fast track to the experience Spain, waltz around Austria and can-can they’re after. through France. It was for these intrepid The most common travellers that Contiki created multioverseas adventure planned The final slice of the travel pie goes to those country European holidays, so they can see 26% who just want to visit a single location. y 18 to 35s is one where all the sights they desire. Contiki gets it, which is why it introduced they travel to more than one fabulous city stays which allow travellers to The second most commonly planned country in a single really settle into a city and feel like a local. trip by 39% of those aspiring to travel internationally in the next three to continent. four years is one visiting two or more continents on a single trip. And with time such a precious resource for busy 18 to 35s, squeezing the most out of their holiday is vitally important.

With exciting itineraries on offer in Europe, North America (including Mexico), Asia and 47% 39% One country Australia, Contiki has four of the world’s seven continents crossedTwo or more on a single continents on a off for these frequent flyers. continent single trip travel treNDS aBoUt coNtiKi But to some, packing in as much as possible means thoroughly savouring the complex flavours of one country. They’re opting for one hearty main course of their own, rather than a degustation style experience. In fact, 31% plan to take such a trip in the next three to four years.

From Contiki’s experience, many of these young 31% Travel extensively around a single country 26% One city or location appeNDiX TRAVELLER PROFILE 35 What they want ticking the boxes When it comes to what young Australians are doing once clearing customs, the lure of iconic images such as the Statue of Liberty, Big Ben and the Colosseum is ever-strong. Sightseeing tops the to-do list, with 98% wanting to go beyond pictures and postcards and see the scenes of glittering Paris by night, the dusty landscape of the Egyptian pyramids and a sunset in Santorini up close and personal.

Far from just seeking a pash and dash encounter with the Blarney Stone, young travellers are demanding in-depth, authentic and meaningful travel experiences. So much so that experiencing local culture and meeting the locals is identified as important to 95% of young people. So, after checking out Gaudi’s Sagrada Familia, they’re stepping into a local tapas bar to sample the regional specialties and say hola to the locals. On top of that, visiting the world’s fascinating festivals took the fancy of 77%, a sure fire way to get into the local scene. 0% are adventurous types and want to get their adrenalin pumping carving up the fresh Austrian powder or sailing the azure waters of the Greek Islands. Retail therapy is what the doctor ordered for 82%. Not just favoured by the fairer sex, 78% of fashion-conscious fellas plan to hit the shops while OS. The social scene also rates highly. Catching up with friends or relatives is important to two thirds. Far from just seeking a pash and dash encounter with the Blarney Stone, young travellers are demanding in-depth, authentic and meaningful travel experiences. ravel treNDS aBoUt coNtiKi 98% Sightseeing 95% Meeting the locals 90% Adventure 82% Shopping 77% Visiting festivals appeNDiX TRAVELLER PROFILE 37 Making a break for it the best time to travel With travel clearly such an important life-long pursuit for young people come rain, hail or shine, work, uni or unemployment, their travel mandate is as unwavering as the Queen’s guardsmen. But the jury is split on when the best time in life to travel is. The majority of young Australians (40%) are tallying up their time off, believing the best time to travel is on their annual leave.

This was particularly the case for full-time workers, of whom 50% rated it as the ideal time to travel, versus 21% working partFrom time. Overall, 19% of 18 to 35s think breaks from the books during uni holidays is the ideal time to lock in their tickets. 13% load their packs while in between jobs, while 11% think hightailing it far away as soon as school is finished is the way to go. Just a few have grey nomad envy, with 3% rating retirement as the best time to travel, the same number singling out a student exchange as their top timing pick.

From Vietnam to Vegas, Vienna to Vancouver the ever-expanding to-do lists of today’s travellers just mean they have to be more clever about how they fit their travels into their busy lives. But make no mistake, like putting on a pair of skinny leg jeans, they’ll Vietnam to bend, twist and squeeze their various life Vegas, Vienna to Vancouver commitments to fit in with their lifetime of the ever-expanding to-do planned itineraries. travel treNDS lists of today’s travellers just mean they have to be more clever about how they fit their travels into their busy lives. aBoUt coNtiKi 40% Annual leave 9% Uni holidays 13% In between jobs 11% As soon as school finishes 3% Student exchange 3% Retirement appeNDiX TRAVELLER PROFILE 39 t r ave l TRAVEL TRENDS So just what have our young people been up to over the last few years and where are they heading to next? Read on for an insider’s guide on the far-reaching footprints of our 18 to 35s over the past few years, the global hot spots for their next pit stops, and some unique insights into the different state-by-state attitudes, actions and aspirations of young Aussies. trends ABOUT CONTIKI APPENDIX The latest trends – Who? What? When? Where? Why?

So just what have our young people been up to over the last few years and where are they heading to next? Read on for an insider’s guide on the far-reaching footprints of our 18 to 35s over the past few years, the global hot spots for their next pit stops, and some unique insights into the different state-by-state attitudes, actions and aspirations of young Aussies. aBoUt coNtiKi appeNDiX Global footprints tracking where they have been Like bulls at Pamplona, 18 to 35s are charging across the globe at a record pace, so following their footprints and tracking their movements is a difficult task.

But Contiki has come to the rescue, with the inside track on where this lot has been in the last three to four years. Half of young Australians fine-tuned their chopstick skills and explored the colourful cultures of Asia in the last three to four years. With a high level of accessibility to Asia via budget airlines, new routes popping up regularly, shorter haul flights and the appeal of its exotic cultures, it’s no surprise our adventurous young people have developed into real Asiaphiles. Still quite close to home, a third visited the Pacific.

There’s little doubt about what the “it-destination” for this region was. Hotter than the hot springs of Rotorua, a NZ pit stop attracted a total of 25% of young travellers eager to experience this land of pristine wilds and non-stop adventure. life celebrity culture, glitzy icons and great outdoors of the US of A, where as the natural wonders and relaxed culture of Canada was a must for 9%. But don’t think the travel bugs are now out of their systems. The world’s departure lounges are only set to get more crowded, with travel still the number one aspiration with 1. The world’s departure million young Aussies planning to travel OS in the coming couple of years. Far from being lounges are only set to pipedreams, 1. 1 million of those are actively get more crowded, with balancing their budgets to save for these trips. Young people are clearly putting their money travel still the number one where their mouths are. Around three in 10 (29%) took a welldeserved Euro-splash in the travel ocean in the past three to four years, with England calling loud and clear, enticing 21% of travellers to her cosy pubs, historic monuments and vibrant nightlife. spiration with 1. 7 million young Aussies. aBoUt coNtiKi 50% Asia 29% Europe The Americas attracted their fair share of Aussie youngsters to their fine shores, with a total of 24% jetting across the Pacific. Drawing the biggest crowds for the region, 20% dosed up on the larger-than- 32% The Pacific 24% appeNDiX The Americas TRENDS 43 The Euro files where they want to go Next stop ladies and gentlemen…Europe. With a smorgasbord of destinations on offer, travellers planning a continental crusade have spoken on where they’ll be heading on their next escapations.

Long has the call of Ol’ Blighty attracted travellers and mother England remains on top, with 70% en route to pay their respects to our monarchy. The alluring scent of freshly baked baguettes tickled the tastebuds of 65%, with France featuring in the number two spot, and a fraction less are opting to satisfy their sweet tooth with Italy’s tempting tiramisu. Old favourites Germany, Spain and Switzerland are next on the itinerary, with Greek plates smashing right at their heels.

Over a third raised their hands to sample Ireland’s famous black drop, and slightly less may require a swig of Guinness to wash down their haggis in Scotland. Rounding out the top ten, 28% are going Dutch at the discos in the Netherlands, but saving room to sample the local cheese and compare the nation’s traditional clogs to their own collection of kicks. But a few rising stars are attracting considerable interest. Over a quarter prefer their museums to be open air and are heading to antiquity-laden Egypt.

A fifth of aspiring 18 to 35 aged travellers are rushing to Russia for a taste of the famous art-filled Moscow metro and St Petersburg’s jam-packed Hermitage Museum. And continuing the strong trend of the past few years, Eastern European gems like the Czech Republic, Croatia and Poland continue to draw crowds. aBoUt coNtiKi 70% England 65% France 61% Italy 51% Germany 42% Spain 40% Greece appeNDiX TRENDS 45 Asia fantasia where they want to go With Asia drawing the largest number of young travellers in the last three to four years, our research shows that the lure of this exotic continent is not waning.

Those planning a trip there in the coming couple of years are not just seeking out main city destinations, but heading off the beaten track to dig up some unique experiences. Topping the list, 45% of travellers plan to visit Bangkok for a heady dose of culture, as they bargain at the markets and cruise the city’s waterways in traditional long tail boats. Up the road a little, but worlds away and taking out fourth place on the list, over a fifth are after the temple-filled town of Chang Mai, also the perfect place for a spot of Thai cooking instruction.

Viva Vietnam – this so-hot-right-now destination has taken out second and third place, with a third of travellers drawn to the country’s biggest city, Ho Chi Min City, and 23% opting for its more sedate capital Hanoi, the culture capital. Also on the wish list, although a little further down the charts, is the Mekong Delta (12%), the ultimate off the beaten track experience, perhaps with an overnight stay with a local family during their cruise. Da Nang also rated on Bangkok Ho Chi Minh City their travel radars drawing 10% and another one in ten want to cycle through UNESCO-listed Hoi An. eventh (Angkor Wat) and ninth spots (Siam Reap). It seems Angkor Wat’s mind-boggling ruins, the floating villages on Tonle Sap Lake and the sombre legacy of the Khmer Rouge have captured the imaginations of our young, adventurous population. With only 1% of travellers lingering in Laos in the last three to four years, it has rocketed up the charts, sneaking into the top ten of next stops, with 12% of travellers dreaming of their very own Mekong River experience. aBoUt coNtiKi 45% 32% 23% Hanoi 21% Chang Mai Back to the high flyers, Cambodia has swooped in to grab the sixth (Phenom Penh), appeNDiX TRENDS 47

Across the ditch where they want to go The winds of the land of the long white cloud are blowing the majority of Aussie travellers into Auckland, with nearly three quarters planning to navigate their way to the City of Sails. Lagging a little behind, but still well in the race for our young travellers, over half are getting spiritual and heading to the “Cathedral City” of Christchurch (57%), foodies are checking into Wellington’s famed restaurant scene (56%) and a fraction less bungy jumping, jetting or skiing it down to Queenstown (51%). Our Land Down Under has obviously bred a lot of nature lovers.

The destinations rounding out the top ten are all part of New Zealand’s pristine wilderness and great outdoors. The bubbling mud of Rotorua has got a third of young Aussies’ blood boiling with excitement. Three in ten are setting sail around the Bay of Islands for some fishing, dolphin spotting or snorkelling and 21% are off hobbit hunting through majestic Milford Sound. In tenth spot, nearly 20% of young people want to explore Franz Josef and Fox Glaciers. aBoUt coNtiKi 72% Auckland 57% Christchurch 56% Wellington 51% Queenstown 33% Rotorua 30% appeNDiX Bay of Islands TRENDS 49 Yankee doodle doo here they want to go Start spreading the news. New York is more popular than ever, with three quarters of travellers planning to take a bite of the Big Apple on their next trips (5% up on last year). The pull of the US of A’s glitzy cities doesn’t stop there, with LA (61%) and Las Vegas (57%) also high rollers on the wish list. It’s no surprise that these cities draw a crowd, like a jackpot winner in Vegas. With a few big handfuls of today’s TV series’ set in the big three travellers are snaring their own golden tickets to Hollywood, or following in the fancy footsteps of Carrie & Co to see it all for themselves.

The call of the ocean and the chance to learn to surf like a pro whet the appetite of 47% of people who are planning a trip to Hawaii (although interestingly 56% of these travellers are pulling on their bikinis, compared to 40% tying up their boardies). 39% prefer the spray of fresh water to salt water in their eyes, opting for the roar of Niagara Falls, where as aqua-phobes are hiking or helicoptering around the rim of the Grand Canyon (30%), soaking up New York Los Angeles Las Vegas the natural wonders’ magic sunsets. Maybe inspired by the 2008 presidential election, nearly a third want to get patriotic in the nation’s capital.

While the Windy City of Chicago has a quarter of kids rocking, 22% are jamming to a different tune walking to the beat along the Freedom Trail, before seeking a rendezvous with Ted Danson at the original Cheers Bar in Boston. aBoUt coNtiKi 75% 61% 57% 47% Hawaii 44% San Francisco 39% appeNDiX Niagara Falls TRENDS 51 about ABOUT CONTIKI “Over the years the nature of touring and the youth market has changed…and just as importantly so has Contiki. The company stands for people who are open to new experiences, receptive to change and ready for unforgettable adventures. ” contiki APPENDIX Past, present and the road ahead Over the years the nature of touring and the youth market has changed…and just as importantly so has Contiki. The company stands for people who are open to new experiences, receptive to change and ready for unforgettable adventures. ” appeNDiX Contiki started small, with one man, a financially challenged New Zealander with big travel ideas and no savings. In 1962 he pinned a small sheet to a noticeboard in the Overseas Visitors Club in Earl’s Court, London. He hadn’t actually sold a single seat when he pinned up that notice, but he figured if he could get 12 people in a minibus and divide the costs by 11, he’d be travelling for free.

But selling those seats wasn’t the end of it as once they were sold he had 11 total strangers expecting him to take them around Europe. He hadn’t ever driven in Europe, let alone on the right side of the road. On his return to London after the first trip, there were more names on the noticeboard so he decided to do another trip. These first tours were all booked by 19 to 29 year olds so right from the start Contiki was all about youth travel – and it was from these humble beginnings that Contiki was born. The company has grown enormously since then.

Today, it’s a global success story and an internationally recognised brand covering Europe, the USA, Asia, New Zealand and Australia. Over the years the nature of touring and the youth market has changed…and just as importantly so has Contiki. The company stands for people who are open to new experiences, receptive to change and ready for unforgettable adventures. Whatever holiday you’re looking for, Contiki’s got it covered. Whether it’s an adventure packed road trip across America or cultural overload in some of Europe’s finest cities, you’ll experience more than you ever expected.

Contiki’s more global than you might think – we’re not just about the USA and Europe, we also go to Russia, Egypt, Hawaii, Turkey, Croatia, Canada, Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and Scandinavia, to name just a few of our other amazing destinations! Contiki truly offers something for everyone with heaps of holiday styles to choose from. There’s our great Multi Country itineraries perfect for first timers to Europe, or if you’re a bit short on time and you want to fit in as much as you can.

If you’re after the chance to get up close and personal with just one or two countries check out our In-depth Regional itineraries which hone in on a particular destination so you can really immerse in its culture. Perhaps you’d like to combine your trip with one of the big special events on Europe’s bustling social calendar, like Oktoberfest, Easter in Amsterdam, the Edinburgh Festival or a number of other brilliant experiences. Contiki’s Special Interest trips, Which are one-off itineraries that coincide with major European events and festivals, are the perfect pick.

Picture yourself buying local treasures on the cobbled streets of Florence, or cruising the Nile on a felucca. Let the rapids of the Austrian Tyrol give you a white-water workout, check out France from a hot air balloon over the Champagne vineyards, celebrate the New Year in Las Vegas or New York, ski and bungee in New Zealand head outback in OZ, taste bush tucker or quad bike though the red dust. Whatever your choice, we can take you further! We know that a highlight of any journey is the people you meet and with Contiki you’ll be mixing and making friends with other travellers from all around the globe.

What makes Contiki really special is our people. From experience we know that having our crew on the ground is way better than any guide book or search engine. Our tour managers really know their stuff – they’ll take right into the heart of a destination. From weird and wonderful regional delicacies, to shopping boutiques the locals love, sharing tips on the local arts and theatre scene, or checking out the most colourful nightspots, they’ll be there to help you get the most out of your trip. Contiki’s been making the most of travelling for over 45 years, right since we started with one man’s dream of a fun, budget trip around Europe!

We know that travel should blow your mind, and not your budget, and we go further to give you an amazing travel experience that you can afford to enjoy! From summer fun to winter thrills, city hopping, country escapes, beach fun or mountain chalets, by plane, metro, cruise boat, kayak, cable cars or bike, we’ll take you on a global adventure. appeNDiX ABOUT CONTIKI 55 contiki timeline John Anderson ran the first tour of Europe in a 12-seater minibus 1961 > 1965 > 1967 > 1974 > First European Brochure published. First Ski program to Austria < 1964 < 1966 < 1971 < 1978

Contiki Travel was founded, realising the 19 to 29 year old market Tours to Egypt launched Tours to Russia & Scandinavia, Spain, Portugal, & Morocco introduced There were 50 Contiki minibuses on the roads of Europe Contiki started using Mercedes Benz coaches in Europe ‘Concept’ and ‘Year-Round Hotel’ tours were launched. Up until 1977, all Contiki tours were camping tours with clients pitching tents and cooking for themselves. Market research showed clients wanted more Contiki’s New Zealand tours commenced 1981 > 1984 > 1991 > The Australian and Fiji touring program was introduced lt; 1982 < 1989 The American touring program was launched Contiki was sold to Trafalgar Tours, starting a travel giant that later became known as The Travel Corporation Egypt program launched, North American program was broadened to include the Canadian Rockies < 1993 Israel program was launched Contiki launched ‘Regional’ tours introducing the ‘Italian Program‘ 1994 > 1997 > The American program extended to include other parts of North America including New York. Eastern European tour called ‘Eastern Roads’ launched < 1995 < 1998 Spain/Portugal program was launched.

The North American program was broadened to include Hawaii. A Western Australia series was launched down under An enhanced ‘Mediterranean Cruise’ program was introduced New ‘Tuscany’ tour was introduced to provide travellers the opportunity to discover a specific region at a more relaxed pace and in greater depth Additional ‘Regional’ tours in Europe were launched including the ‘Road to Morocco’ 1999 > 2001 > New Contiki logo was introduced with an updated, stylised sun and bold brand name that conveys the company’s bright, fun outlook Contiki’s North America program expanded to include Alaska.

Contiki online launches ‘Contikipedia’, its very own wiki, packed full of information and everything travellers have ever wanted to know about the Contiki experience. Contiki launches ‘Charging on the Go’ fitting out its coaches with on board charging units so travellers can recharge personal electronic items Leading Travel Companies of the World Conservation Foundation launched Contiki breaks the traditional Asian holiday mould with the introduction of a brand new Asian touring program featuring seven itineraries including Vietnam, Thailand, Laos and Cambodia < 2000 < 2003 2006 > < 2007 2008 >

Contiki launched a new product called ‘Getaway’ in Europe aimed at the more independent traveller Contiki launches first ever dedicated Gap Year itineraries for young Australians taking a year out to live overseas following school < today – 2009 Contiki invests €3 million into upgrading its exclusive properties. appeNDiX ABOUT CONTIKI 57 1. Household status ? ? ? ? Live alone Live with parents Live in shared household without kids Live in shared household with your kids ? ? ? ? Live with partner without kids Live with partner with kids Live without partner with kids None of the above . Thinking now about your aspirations. Which of these would you like to do in the next 3-4 years? ? Buy a property, such as a unit, townhouse, house, etc ? Travel overseas ? Travel in Australia ? Buy a big ticket item, such as a large TV, home cinema, etc ? None of the above 3. And which of these are you currently saving for? ? ? ? ? Buy a car Buy a property, such as a unit, townhouse, house, etc Travel overseas Travel in Australia ? Buy a big ticket item, such as a large TV, home cinema, etc ? I am not currently saving, but enjoying spending my money now ? None of the above . Which of these are you planning to do in the next 3-4 years? ? Take one short overseas holiday ? Take a number of overseas trips ? Take the trip of a lifetime, a once-only experience ? Travel extensively for a number of months ? None of the above 5. And which of these types of overseas trip are you likely to do in the next 3-4 years? ? A trip where you only visit one city or location. ? A trip where you travel extensively around one country only ? A trip where you travel to more than one country on one continent only ? Visit two or more continents on the same trip…. None of the above 6. Which countries, if any, have you visited in the past 3-4 years? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Austria Croatia Czech Republic France Germany Greece Hungary Ireland Italy ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Netherlands Spain Switzerland Other Europe (specify) Cambodia China Hong Kong India Indonesia appendix ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Japan Laos Malaysia Singapore Thailand Vietnam Other Asia (specify) Argentina Brazil ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Canada Mexico Peru USA Other the Americas (specify) Fiji New Caledonia New Zealand Papua New Guinea APPENDIX the survey – the questions we asked 1.

Household status ? ? ? ? Live alone Live with parents Live in shared household without kids Live in shared household with your kids ? ? ? ? Live with partner without kids Live with partner with kids Live without partner with kids None of the above 2. Thinking now about your aspirations. Which of these would you like to do in the next 3-4 years? ? Buy a property, such as a unit, townhouse, house, etc ? Travel overseas ? Travel in Australia ? Buy a big ticket item, such as a large TV, home cinema, etc ? None of the above 3. And which of these are you currently saving for? ? ? ? ?

Buy a car Buy a property, such as a unit, townhouse, house, etc Travel overseas Travel in Australia ? Buy a big ticket item, such as a large TV, home cinema, etc ? I am not currently saving, but enjoying spending my money now ? None of the above 4. Which of these are you planning to do in the next 3-4 years? ? Take one short overseas holiday ? Take a number of overseas trips ? Take the trip of a lifetime, a once-only experience ? Travel extensively for a number of months ? None of the above 5. And which of these types of overseas trip are you likely to do in the next 3-4 years? ? A trip where you only visit one city or location. A trip where you travel extensively around one country only ? A trip where you travel to more than one country on one continent only ? Visit two or more continents on the same trip…. ? None of the above 6. Which countries, if any, have you visited in the past 3-4 years? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Austria Croatia Czech Republic France Germany Greece Hungary Ireland Italy ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Netherlands Spain Switzerland Other Europe (specify) Cambodia China Hong Kong India Indonesia ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Japan Laos Malaysia Singapore Thailand Vietnam Other Asia (specify) Argentina Brazil ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Canada Mexico Peru USA Other the Americas (specify) Fiji New Caledonia New Zealand Papua New Guinea 7. If you were planning a trip to Europe, which of these destinations would you visit? ? ? ? ? ? ? Austria Croatia Czech Republic Egypt (Middle East)… England France ? ? ? ? ? ? Germany Greece/Greek Islands Hungary Ireland Italy Poland ? ? ? ? ? ? Russia Scandinavia Scotland Slovakia Spain Switzerland ? ? ? ? The Netherlands Turkey (Middle East). Wales None of these 8. If you were planning a trip to New Zealand, which of these destinations would you visit? ? Auckland ?

Bay of Islands ? Christchurch ? Frans Josef / Fox Glacier ? Milford Sound ? Picton ? Queenstown ? Rotorua ? Taupo ? Te Anau ? Wellington ? None of these 9. If you were planning a trip to the USA, which of these destinations would you visit? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Boston (Massachusetts) Cape Canaveral (Florida) Chicago (Illinois) Cleveland (Ohio) Dallas (Texas) Grand Canyon (Arizona)….. Hawaii LA (California) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Las Vegas (Nevada) Madison (Wisconsin) Memphis (Tennessee) Milwaukee (Illinois) Mount Rushmore (S Dakota) New Orleans (Louisiana) New York Niagara Falls (New York) ? ? ? ? ? ? ? Orlando (Florida) Philadelphia (Pennsylvania) Phoenix (Arizona) Route 66 (Arizona) San Diego (California) San Francisco (California) Santa Fe (New Mexico) Savannah (Georgia) ? ? ? ? ? Sioux Falls (S Dakota) Washington DC West Coast National Parks (Yosemite, Mojave, Zion, Bryce) None of these 10. If you were planning a trip to Asia, which of these destinations would you visit? ? ? ? ? ? ? Angkor Wat (Cambodia) Phnom Penh (Cambodia) Siam Reap (Cambodia) Luang Prabang (Laos) Pakbeng (Laos) The Mekong River (Laos)… ? ? ? ? ? ?

Vang Vieng (Laos) Vientiane (Laos) Bangkok (Thailand) Chang Mai (Thailand) Chang Rai (Thailand) The Hill Tribes and the Golden Triangle (Thailand) ? Da Nang (Vietnam) ? Halong Bay (Vietnam) ? Hanoi (Vietnam) ? Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnam) ? Hoi An (Vietnam) ? ? ? ? ? Hue (Vietnam) Mekoing Delta (Vietnam) Nha Trang (Vietnam) Sapa (Vietnam) None of these 11. Thinking now about the different things which make up an overseas trip. Please select how important it is to you that an overseas trip contain the following. ? ? ? ? Seeing the sights Experiencing local culture / meeting locals Adventure Shopping ? ? ? Visiting friends or relatives Volunteering Visiting festivals (music, cultural etc. ) Meeting other travellers 12. How important are each of the following to you when considering an overseas holiday? ? ? ? ? Achieving a good work-life balance Broadening your horizons Meeting new people Seeing new places ? To understand people and cultures which are different to yours ? Having a break from work or study ? Being able to relax and gain perspective 13. Do you agree or disagree with the following statements? ? Overall, travel helps my career prospects ? Travel helps make me a better employee ?

You prefer to travel when you are young, and focus on your career afterwards ? An employer is more likely to hire someone who has travelled than someone who has not ? Travelling teaches people skills they would never learn in the workplace ? People who have travelled have a better attitude to work 14. Please select the skills that travel gives you which can help you with your career, or your life in general? ? ? ? ? ? The ability to budget Problem solving and decision making Better social skills How to deal with different personalities Better understanding of different cultures and customs ? ? ? ? Better awareness of world issues Greater confidence Greater maturity Greater tolerance None of the above 15. Which of the following are important to help you achieve a good work-life balance? ? ? ? ? ? Being able to look forward to holidays Being able to take short breaks to get away from it all Reasonable working hours Good working conditions Time to further your education ? ? ? ? Meeting new people Spending time with family and friends Being able to change jobs frequently None of the above 16. In your opinion, when is the best time in life to travel? ? ? ? On student exchange Straight after school On university breaks On annual leave when working ? In between jobs ? After retirement ? None of the above / don’t know 17. When considering an overseas holiday to a place you have never been before which one of these would you prefer? ? A tailor-made holiday that has been designed to incorporate a mix of sightseeing, culture and adventure ? An independent holiday where you are responsible for organising everything ? A combination of tailor-made and independent holiday ? Don’t know APPENDIX 61

Post Author: admin