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Healing Hospital: A Daring Paradigm The Healing Hospital paradigm focuses on the Holistic approach to health care (Chapman, 2007). Many of the Healing Hospitals and other clinical facilities have made the transition from treating illness only to an over-all healing approach. The Healing Hospital paradigm addresses the healing of the whole person, spirit, soul and body (Chapman, 2007). The over-all approach includes the well being of the patient, cognitive, emotional and the relationship to spirituality. Healing a word used by the Anglo-Saxon which means to make whole (Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, 2003).

In today’s hospital environment, our main focus is placed on technology, medications, and treating a diagnosis (Mendocino Coast District Hospital, 2009). The mission of a healing hospital is to improve health. There are very few hospitals that have made it their mission to heal and not just treat the signs and symptoms of illness. Healing is more than simply an academic exercise. Healing Hospital concept specifies three key components: 1. A Healing Physical Environment 2. The Integration of Work Design and Technology 3. A Culture of Radical Loving Care

A Healing Physical Environment includes the type of care the patient is receiving and the conditions that a patient is exposed to when receiving treatments, the aesthetics of the hospital and the noise level in patient care areas (Eberst, 2006). For a hospital to promote healing, it needs to provide a quiet environment that allows patients to sleep. We have learned that providing a loving and compassionate environment that is aesthetically pleasing and promotes healing, and patients perform the most repair during sleep (Eberst, 2006). Integrating Work Design and Technology is the second key component of a Healing Hospital (Eberst, 2006).

Working with hospital building designers skilled in the purpose of a Healing Hospital at its core, hospitals that are designed in a traditional healing manner will facilitate healing of patients more quickly, curing the illness (Eberst, 2006). Many times hospital’s physical environment is often found noisy with blinking monitors, noise from equipment, bright lights, relatives seeking assistance and often times grieving just outside the patient’s room, there is usually a heightened sense of anxiety in the hallway (Eberst, 2006). However, the

Healing Hospital environment offers technical advancements and is able to design and integrate technology into a caring environment delivered by a caring medical staff. Patient’s cared for at Mercy Gilbert have the latest technology in pulmonary testing, cardiology and radiology where the doctors are able to assess test results from their office, which speeds up decision making and assists in planning treatment at an earlier date (Eberst, 2006). Healing environments include more than just the patient, but also encompasses the knowledge to help the family members and others that may be involved with the support of the patient (Eberst, 2006).

The third and most critical component of a Healing Hospital is totally embracing a culture of “Radical Loving Care. ” The philosophy championed by the healthcare industry leader, Erie Chapman (2003). This holistic philosophy promotes the healing of the whole person, spirit, soul and body. The philosophy of Erie Chapman also offers the healthcare staff to return to the era of why they actually began their medical health journey. A Healing Hospital environment helps make a stressful experience in the patients life, a positive experience thorough receiving compassionate care by the entire staff (Chapman, 2003).

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